This activity will guide you in : Identifying your ability to…

Question Answered step-by-step This activity will guide you in : Identifying your ability to…  This activity will guide you in:Identifying your ability to complete a focused assessment, fall assessment, SBAR, and educate on discharge planningDevelop critical thinking skills through this nursing process activity  As the student, you should read the following case study and continually add to the following activity each week during post-conference with the faculty and submit your final completed case study on week 4:1)  Identify Priority Problem and your rationale2) Determine patient goals related to priority problem (must be measurable and pertinent to    priority problem)3) List at least two desired positive outcomes for patient care and rationales 4)  List four nursing interventions for the presenting problems for this patient with rationale5)  Define the pathophysiology for presenting problems and associated medication Remember each question must be answered in detail with rationales as directed. Also, make sure to use APA format, times new roman 12 font, and complete spell check before submission. Case Study Patient InformationFrances Mathis is an 80-year-old Caucasian female who lives alone in a small home. Her husband, Bill, passed away a year ago, and she has a dog, Katie, who is especially important to her. Frances has two daughters; Marilyn Amber, 60, lives nearby and is Frances’s primary support system. Her current medical problems include hypertension, glaucoma, osteoarthritis of the knee, stress incontinence, osteoporosis, and hypercholesterolemia.Frances was seen at the clinic for routine examination and medication follow-up three weeks ago. She tells the nurse she takes several anti-hypertensive medications, diuretics, and analgesics. During her assessment, Frances provides vital details to the nurse of how she views her current situation. All information has been charted in Frances’s chart. Frances visits with her doctor, and no changes to her care have been made at this time. Frances will have a follow-up visit in 2 months.Several weeks have passed since the clinic visit, and Frances is now in the hospital with a urinary tract infection and dehydration diagnosis. Her presentation is atypical, and she is confused. Her daughter is at her bed side and the nurse is doing a total assessment on Frances. It now shifts change (7 PM), and you have received a report from the off-going nurse. Frances has been in her room on the medical-surgical unit for six hours. She was in the Emergency Department overnight because there were no available beds on the medical units. Due to her confusion, Frances did not take her medications properly in the days prior to admission, and as a result, her blood pressure is significantly elevated. Frances’s daughter, Marilyn, is at the bedside and is quite concerned about the confusion and elevated blood pressure.Shift Report Time: 7:00 PM: Nurse going off shift providing reportSituation: Frances Mathis, an 80-year-old female brought to the ER by her daughter with confusion.Background: When Frances’s daughter stopped in to see her yesterday evening, she found that she was not making sense or acting right. She brought her to the ER, and a decision was made to admit her, but she remained in the ER all night until a bed became available an hour ago. Mrs. Mathis has a history of hypertension, glaucoma, osteoporosis, arthritis, elevated cholesterol, and stress incontinence. It is unclear whether she has taken her medications properly the past few days; her daughter could not tell from looking at her medication box.Assessment: Frances’s vital signs at 3:30 AM: temperature 99.4, heart rate 96, respirations 14, BP 190/98. She was not oriented to time or place and seemed quite confused even now.Her labs were drawn in the ED. Her lab results show: 12000 WBC’s, an elevated sodium, and a urine specific gravity of 1.050. These findings are leading to some signs of a UTI. Urine culture is being done for further analysis, but the patient had to be cued on several instructions with stand-by assistance. Her primary physician Dr. Lund was notified of her admission and gave orders for new medications and routine home medications. I just gave her PM meds about 15 minutes ago, which were: captopril, metoprolol, furosemide, pilocarpine drops, ciprofloxacin, celecoxib, and atorvastatin before dinner. She says she is not experiencing any pain. Current vital signs temperature 97.4, heart rate 76, respirations 14, BP 170/84.Physician’s OrdersAllergies/Sensitivities: None known           0700      ED OrdersLabs: CBC, Basic Metabolic Panel, Urinalysis, Bathroom privileges with assistance.    Samantha Turner MD, ED Team            0800      Transfer to Medical UnitBathroom privileges with assistance.Regular, low-fat diet     I & O record every 4 hours Metoprolol 100 mg po every day Atorvastatin 50 mg po daily Pilocarpine, 2% eye, drops, each eye instill 2 drops BIDAleve 200 mg po prn pain every 6 hoursCiprofloxacin 250 mg po every 12 hours Acetaminophen 325 mg PO every 6 hours prn fever                                                                                                                                                                                                                               Eric Lund, MDThis activity will guide you in:Identifying your ability to complete a focused assessment, fall assessment, SBAR, and educate on discharge planningDevelop critical thinking skills through this nursing process activity  As the student, you should read the following case study and continually add to the following activity each week during post-conference with the faculty and submit your final completed case study on week 4:1)  Identify Priority Problem and your rationale2) Determine patient goals related to priority problem (must be measurable and pertinent to    priority problem)3) List at least two desired positive outcomes for patient care and rationales 4)  List four nursing interventions for the presenting problems for this patient with rationale5)  Define the pathophysiology for presenting problems and associated medication Remember each question must be answered in detail with rationales as directed. Also, make sure to use APA format, times new roman 12 font, and complete spell check before submission. Case Study Patient InformationFrances Mathis is an 80-year-old Caucasian female who lives alone in a small home. Her husband, Bill, passed away a year ago, and she has a dog, Katie, who is especially important to her. Frances has two daughters; Marilyn Amber, 60, lives nearby and is Frances’s primary support system. Her current medical problems include hypertension, glaucoma, osteoarthritis of the knee, stress incontinence, osteoporosis, and hypercholesterolemia.Frances was seen at the clinic for routine examination and medication follow-up three weeks ago. She tells the nurse she takes several anti-hypertensive medications, diuretics, and analgesics. During her assessment, Frances provides vital details to the nurse of how she views her current situation. All information has been charted in Frances’s chart. Frances visits with her doctor, and no changes to her care have been made at this time. Frances will have a follow-up visit in 2 months.Several weeks have passed since the clinic visit, and Frances is now in the hospital with a urinary tract infection and dehydration diagnosis. Her presentation is atypical, and she is confused. Her daughter is at her bed side and the nurse is doing a total assessment on Frances. It now shifts change (7 PM), and you have received a report from the off-going nurse. Frances has been in her room on the medical-surgical unit for six hours. She was in the Emergency Department overnight because there were no available beds on the medical units. Due to her confusion, Frances did not take her medications properly in the days prior to admission, and as a result, her blood pressure is significantly elevated. Frances’s daughter, Marilyn, is at the bedside and is quite concerned about the confusion and elevated blood pressure.Shift Report Time: 7:00 PM: Nurse going off shift providing reportSituation: Frances Mathis, an 80-year-old female brought to the ER by her daughter with confusion.Background: When Frances’s daughter stopped in to see her yesterday evening, she found that she was not making sense or acting right. She brought her to the ER, and a decision was made to admit her, but she remained in the ER all night until a bed became available an hour ago. Mrs. Mathis has a history of hypertension, glaucoma, osteoporosis, arthritis, elevated cholesterol, and stress incontinence. It is unclear whether she has taken her medications properly the past few days; her daughter could not tell from looking at her medication box.Assessment: Frances’s vital signs at 3:30 AM: temperature 99.4, heart rate 96, respirations 14, BP 190/98. She was not oriented to time or place and seemed quite confused even now.Her labs were drawn in the ED. Her lab results show: 12000 WBC’s, an elevated sodium, and a urine specific gravity of 1.050. These findings are leading to some signs of a UTI. Urine culture is being done for further analysis, but the patient had to be cued on several instructions with stand-by assistance. Her primary physician Dr. Lund was notified of her admission and gave orders for new medications and routine home medications. I just gave her PM meds about 15 minutes ago, which were: captopril, metoprolol, furosemide, pilocarpine drops, ciprofloxacin, celecoxib, and atorvastatin before dinner. She says she is not experiencing any pain. Current vital signs temperature 97.4, heart rate 76, respirations 14, BP 170/84.Physician’s OrdersAllergies/Sensitivities: None known           0700      ED OrdersLabs: CBC, Basic Metabolic Panel, Urinalysis, Bathroom privileges with assistance.    Samantha Turner MD, ED Team            0800      Transfer to Medical UnitBathroom privileges with assistance.Regular, low-fat diet     I & O record every 4 hours Metoprolol 100 mg po every day Atorvastatin 50 mg po daily Pilocarpine, 2% eye, drops, each eye instill 2 drops BIDAleve 200 mg po prn pain every 6 hoursCiprofloxacin 250 mg po every 12 hours Acetaminophen 325 mg PO every 6 hours prn fever                                                                                                                                                                                                                               Eric Lund, MD Health Science Science Nursing RNSG 1161 Share QuestionEmailCopy link Comments (0)