The next day in report, you hear that Baby Girl R. did well…

Question The next day in report, you hear that Baby Girl R. did well… The next day in report, you hear that Baby Girl R. did well overnight. She goes to surgery at 0815. Later, the postanesthesia care unit (PACU) nurse tells you that the patient is ready to come to your unit. When she arrives, you and your aide start putting on the monitors. Mr. R. is present, and he asks you to give the baby some pain medication. The open warmer starts alarming because the patient’s skin temperature is reading 35.0°C. You look down at her to see if the temperature probe has fallen off. You see that it is still on, but you also notice that the suture from surgery is no longer intact. Then the oxygen (O,) monitor reads 71% saturated with an accurate waveform, and the pulse oximeter probe is correctly placed on the patient. CASE STUDY PROGRESSTwo days later, you are caring for Baby Girl R. at night. In report, you hear that the parents really want to hold their baby, but they have not yet because they are afraid of causing the suture to open again. They are currently at the bedside, and the infant is due for a feeding,  When you take the bottle in to the patient’s room, you notice a growth chart next to the bed tracking the patient’s occipital frontal circumference (OFC) that is measured at least once per shift. Why is the OFC monitored so closely on postoperative myelomeningocele patients? Health Science Science Nursing NURS 230L Share QuestionEmailCopy link Comments (0)