The answers must be in your own words with reference to the journal…

Question Answered step-by-step The answers must be in your own words with reference to the journal… The answers must be in your own words with reference to the journal or book where you found the evidence to your answer. Do not copy-paste or use past students’ work as all files submitted in this course are registered and saved in turn it in the program.Answers must be scholarly and be 3-4 sentences in length with rationale and explanation. “No Straight forward / Simple answer will be accepted”.  Turn it in Score must be less than 25 % or will not be accepted for credit, must be your own work and in your own words. You can resubmit, Final submission will be accepted if less than 25 %. Copy-paste from websites or textbooks will not be accepted or tolerated. Please see College Handbook with reference to Academic Misconduct Statement.All answers to case studies must have the references cited “in the text” for each answer and a minimum of 2 Scholarly References (Journals, books) (No websites)  per case StudyPagana: Mosby’s Manual of Diagnostic and Laboratory Tests, 5th Edition Thrombophlebitis Case Studies  A 32-year-old nursing assistant was admitted to the hospital complaining of a painful, swollen right leg. She was otherwise in good health. On physical examination, her right leg was one and a half times the size of her left leg. The right calf was tender, and 3+ pitting edema was present. StudiesResultsVenous duplex, Doppler ultrasound, and plethysmography, p. 695Occlusion of the deep venous system in the right thigh and calf (normal: no occlusion)Venography, p. 1076Same as aboveFactor V-Leiden, p. 231Positived-Dimer, p. 2021568 ng/mL Diagnostic Analysis The diagnosis of acute vein thrombophlebitis was made. Normally all the studies noted above would not be ordered, but the tests are shown here to indicate their usage. Venous duplex and Doppler studies are the least invasive; however, venography is the most accurate, especially for suspected disease below the knee.  This young woman has no obvious reason to have deep vein thrombosis (DVT). For that reason, a genetic predisposition to clotting was suspected. One of the most common hypercoagulable states is factor V-Leiden. The patient was positive for this abnormal form of factor V. Factor V-Leiden is not effectively deactivated by the protein C thrombolysis system; therefore, this patient is at increased risk for further thromboembolic episodes. Heparin therapy was prescribed to treat the present DVT and avoid further events. After anticoagulation, N.S. was switched to warfarin (Coumadin) (see Heparin and Warfarin Monitoring, pp. 27 and 100). She was discharged and continued receiving warfarin therapy and physical therapy monitoring. After 4 months, the warfarin was discontinued. Critical Thinking Questions If the patient was to develop an acute episode of shortness of breath, what would you do?What would be included in the diagnostic evaluation of this problem? Health Science Science Nursing MSN 5600L Share QuestionEmailCopy link Comments (0)