pt comes to clinic with a 5-week history of epiphora, nasal…

Question Answered step-by-step pt comes to clinic with a 5-week history of epiphora, nasal…    pt comes  to  clinic with a 5-week history of epiphora, nasal congestion, clear rhinorrhea and cough that is worse at night. She adds that she tends to “sneeze a lot”.  She states that she seems to get a “cold” that lasts all winter and her symptoms seem to improve in the spring. Physical Exam:General Appearance:  The patient appears well and of stated age.  She is in no acute distress, but “snorts” repeatedly.  Her vital signs are stable but you notice that she is mouth-breathing. Integumentary: Warm and dry, without rashesHEENT:  Eyes: PERRLA, fundi benign, sclera mildly injected and minimally chemotic, +epiphora bilaterally.  Nose:  outer nares irritated, internal mucosa is reddened, boggy and moist, without purulent discharge.  Pharynx is mildly erythematous without exudate; thick yellow-greenish postnasal discharge noted.  Ears: tympanic membranes with mild serous otitis.Neck:  supple, no lymphadenopathy, no thyromegalyHeart: regular rate and rhythm, NL S1, S2, no murmurs, rubs, gallopsLungs:  Clear bilaterally to auscultation and percussionNeuro: Non-focalAssessment:The NP diagnoses the patient with allergic rhinitis. Question:What are some differential diagnoses for this patient?What pertinent information would you gather regarding her family and childhood history?What are your positive pertinent physical findings that suggest allergic rhinitis? What diagnostic tests would you order?How would you treat this patient, include pharmacological and non-pharmacological therapies? What would you discuss in your educational plan? Health Science Science Nursing PHARMACY PHARMACOLO Share QuestionEmailCopy link Comments (0)