Kohlberg’s model, which is only based on men’s prejudice, is…

Question Answered step-by-step Kohlberg’s model, which is only based on men’s prejudice, is… Kohlberg’s model, which is only based on men’s prejudice, is divided into three phases. The first stage, which starts from birth until 9 years, is the pre-conventional stage. The moral growth at this stage is self-ego-centric, with is focused on the fear of punishment by authorities from both home and abroad. The second stage, which starts from the age of 10 to 20 years, is the conventional stage. At this age, a person begins to learn to see things from the perspective of others and appreciate what others demand of them. The third stage, which starts from the age of 20 and up, is the post-conventional stage. At this stage, people form moral judgments based on logic, unbiased reasoning, and widely recognized abstract notions of fairness (Blum, n.d.).Carol Gilligan created a three-stage growth model based on women and their care of ethics (Roberts, 2021). The first stage starts when the child is self-and-others-focused, and she does what she believes is best for her. The second stage, which is the traditional stage, is when the person’s concern for others takes precedence. Women at this period acquire a feeling of respect and responsibility for others, and self-sacrifice becomes ingrained in their mentality. The third stage, which is the post-conventional stage, is the stage where women learn and practice how to balance their demands with those of others, and the emphasis switches to a dynamic connection. Care does not remain restricted to a personal relationship in the latter stages of this stage but extends to interpersonal interactions, such as a condemnation of violence against and exploitation of human beings (Blum, n.d.).Gilligan thought that Kohlberg’s theory did not sufficiently address gender variations in moral development because participants in Kohlberg’s study were predominantly male and his theory did not contain the caring viewpoint (Roberts, 2021). Gilligan contended that males and females are frequently socialized differently and that females are more likely than males to emphasize interpersonal connections and accept responsibility for the well-being of others. This distinction, according to Gilligan, is related to the child’s interaction with the mother, and females are usually taught a moral worldview that emphasizes community and caring about personal relationships (Blum, n.d.).This presumption is true for us as well since women are perceived to be more sensitive and sympathetic towards others in their interactions, while males are perceived to be more utilitarian and practical. This trait might occasionally eclipse moral ideals. Women make more equitable and just judgments than males. Women are more interested in finding a middle ground solution that does not harm anyone, whereas males are obsessed with inequity and making decisions one way or the other. Therefore, Gilligan’s theory resonated more with me.In my personal experience, I am guided by the reality that injustice is something I will not allow, but I also do not want to damage anyone while standing up to it. A little sensitivity gets in the way, but it does not stop me from making the moral decision. In terms of moral growth, women, according to Kohlberg’s concept, are inferior to males. Kohlberg’s theory was gender-biased and Gilligan did a good job by highlighting its lack of interpersonal focus and the development of empathy and care for others (Blum, n.d.). Kohlberg’s paradigm is male-centric and does not provide a comprehensive picture of human moral growth which are the issues that I have with his theory.¬†please respond to discussion?¬† Health Science Science Nursing NUR 3125 Share QuestionEmailCopy link Comments (0)